Friday night reads: Siege of Azadi Square A Novel of Revolutionary Iran by Manny Shirazi
Such a fantastic and vivid read about women’s organizing in Iran immediately after the 1979 revolution. It focuses on an intergenerational group of women with mixed political orientation (Islamic feminism, secular feminism, pro regime, anti regime) and how all of them are part of the wider women’s movement against the regime’s compulsory hijab laws.
Shirazi’s writing takes you to the streets of Tehran, to the halls of Tehran University, to the kitchen of women’s homes where so much of their organizing, self care and community support takes place.
Right now I’m just overwhelmed by the sheer ferocity of Iranian women and how strong their collective voices were (and still are) and there are do many dynamic elements to this text I will reflect on in a later post.
But as a second generation diasporic Iranian I’m so thankful that a novel like this exists and that it’s written in English (I can’t read Farsi).
It’s providing so many details about the 1979 revolution I haven’t come across yet (I especially appreciate the time Shirazi spends exploring the different political parties that existed during the 1979 revolution (I find that the diversity of opinions and schools of thought that existed during the revolution is often glossed over in texts about it).

Friday night reads: Siege of Azadi Square A Novel of Revolutionary Iran by Manny Shirazi

Such a fantastic and vivid read about women’s organizing in Iran immediately after the 1979 revolution. It focuses on an intergenerational group of women with mixed political orientation (Islamic feminism, secular feminism, pro regime, anti regime) and how all of them are part of the wider women’s movement against the regime’s compulsory hijab laws.

Shirazi’s writing takes you to the streets of Tehran, to the halls of Tehran University, to the kitchen of women’s homes where so much of their organizing, self care and community support takes place.

Right now I’m just overwhelmed by the sheer ferocity of Iranian women and how strong their collective voices were (and still are) and there are do many dynamic elements to this text I will reflect on in a later post.

But as a second generation diasporic Iranian I’m so thankful that a novel like this exists and that it’s written in English (I can’t read Farsi).

It’s providing so many details about the 1979 revolution I haven’t come across yet (I especially appreciate the time Shirazi spends exploring the different political parties that existed during the 1979 revolution (I find that the diversity of opinions and schools of thought that existed during the revolution is often glossed over in texts about it).

soradfabmedia:

We’ve just launched a stellar indie go go campaign!

Perks include: zines! Adobe suite tutorials! Audio editing tutorials! Homemade jam! Magazine subscription! Tarot card readings! A private party with a DJ! Silk screen art and so much more!

Check out the link above for more info — woo!

I’m part of this delegation :) :) Check out our super rad indie gogo campaign!

baddecision-goodintention:

Save our Schools #walkout215 #liberated

"Running a massive deficit of hundreds of millions of dollars, Philadelphia’s school system is planning to eliminate all sports, extracurricular activities, counselors and libraries—beyond which, for schools eviscerated by austerity politics, there’s not much left to lose. At noon today, May 17, thousands of students are expected to walk out of class and flood downtown."Read more: http://www.thenation.com/blog/174401/what-you-should-know-about-philly-student-walkout#ixzz2TZXriv73

baddecision-goodintention:

Save our Schools #walkout215 #liberated

"Running a massive deficit of hundreds of millions of dollars, Philadelphia’s school system is planning to eliminate all sports, extracurricular activities, counselors and libraries—beyond which, for schools eviscerated by austerity politics, there’s not much left to lose. At noon today, May 17, thousands of students are expected to walk out of class and flood downtown."

Read more: http://www.thenation.com/blog/174401/what-you-should-know-about-philly-student-walkout#ixzz2TZXriv73

(Source: sundaymorningbreakfasts)

outburstm:

Happy belated May Day “Working Class Women Rising”  photo care of Ronak Gee

From the streets of Toronto!

outburstm:

Happy belated May Day “Working Class Women Rising”  photo care of Ronak Gee

From the streets of Toronto!

shamelessmag:

Audre Lorde <3 <3 <3
Self care 101 folks

shamelessmag:

Audre Lorde <3 <3 <3

Self care 101 folks

(Source: nobodiesofnote)

feminishblog:

1) Be willing to confront instances of transphobia, cissexism, cisnormativity, cis-centrism, cis privilege and other forms of destructive bias where you find them (especially when you find them within feminist, activist or queer spaces), not through “call outs” or other toxic, self-defeating or abusive strategies, but by taking the opportunity for genuine discourse.

2) Don’t take a purely passive, reactive approach. Rather than waiting for things like someone saying something overtly cissexist, or a trans person bringing up a particular concern, be willing to proactively introduce trans issues, or trans-relevant aspects of broader issues, to feminist discourse. Likewise, proactively treat possible consequences, perspectives and concerns relevant to trans people and trans experiences as being not only significant but essential to all feminist issues and conversations.

3) Don’t assume any given issue is strictly, or even primarily, relevant to cis women. All feminist concerns are also transgender concerns, and vice versa. There are no feminist dialogues in which trans voices “don’t belong”, or to which trans voices have “nothing to add”. There are no social issues related to gender that don’t have consequences for trans people.

4) Proactively seek out transgender voices, perspectives and input on all issues, not simply what you regard as “trans issues” or situations where the value of such perspectives is immediately obvious to you. Come to us, rather than waiting for us to come to you.

5) Don’t treat the larger social conflict of gender as being dialectic or binary in nature. Don’t assume a unidirectional model of gender-based oppression.

If you have a printer, print this out. If you don’t have a printer, befriend someone who does, and print this out.

(Source: loveyourrebellion, via muslimfeminists)

Wish I could go to this! Will be following the conference online (Twitter, Tumblr)
About the Allied Media Projects (conference organizers):

Allied Media Projects cultivates media strategies for a more just and creative world. From the unique intersection of media and communications, art, technology, education and social justice, we share and develop models for transforming ourselves and our communities. Since 1999, we have hosted the national Allied Media Conference, which now brings together more than 2000 artists, organizers, makers and doers in Detroit each year. In 2011, we launched Detroit Future to promote broadband adoption and build a local media-based economy.

alliedmedia:

Register for the 2012AMC

Wish I could go to this! Will be following the conference online (Twitter, Tumblr)

About the Allied Media Projects (conference organizers):

Allied Media Projects cultivates media strategies for a more just and creative world. From the unique intersection of media and communications, art, technology, education and social justice, we share and develop models for transforming ourselves and our communities. Since 1999, we have hosted the national Allied Media Conference, which now brings together more than 2000 artists, organizers, makers and doers in Detroit each year. In 2011, we launched Detroit Future to promote broadband adoption and build a local media-based economy.

alliedmedia:

Register for the 2012AMC

(Source: unicornvilleamp)

A MILLION LOVES!!!


Street Art By BR1

(via muslimfeminists)

100 % love

thepublicstudio:

Statement of solidarity with the Québec student strike

As organizers, activists and members of marginalized communities we are well aware of our governments’ austerity agenda, directly attacking the working class and poor, women and children, disabled folk, racialized and Indigenous peoples and students. We know our governments are becoming less interested in the welfare of our society, as we continue to experience the effects of cuts to social services, community programs and, most recently, accessible education.

On May 22nd, 2012 more than 400,000 students took to the streets of Montréal to commemorate the 100-day mark of the movement for change spearheaded by students in Québec. As a vanguard in the struggle for accessible education, Québec has demonstrated to the rest of Canada that people power can and will change policies at the state-level. Students have been on strike and out on the streets for more than 100 days and continue to form larger and stronger contingents to demand accessible education for all.

The Public is proud to support the ongoing struggle of the Québec student movement. The call for accessible education also requires a direct critique of current government spending, on all its levels. The money is there; cuts to education are indicative of the state’s skewed priorities. Our communities have been put on the back-burner for long enough.

What started as a student strike to address student debt has now grown to a nation-wide movement against the criminalization of dissent. We believe in the power of direct action, and the right for students and supporters to protest and demonstrate in public.

We support the efforts of organizers and activists as they present clear demands around accessible education, environmental sustainability, financial transparency, an end to police brutality and the right to free speech. We will demonstrate in solidarity and wear our red squares with pride as we continue to connect our struggles and fuel this movement as it spreads nation-wide.

Here in Toronto, student unions, organizers and outraged communities have called for actions across the city. We invite you to join us at any of the following events, connect with us to learn more about the issues and ways to get involved or drop by the studio at any time to pick up your own red square.

Events of interest in Toronto:

Pots and pans rally/noise demo
Wednesday May 30, 8pm at Dufferin Grove Park

Support rally
Tuesday June 5th, 8:30pm at Queen’s Park

Student Solidarity Network meeting
Thursday June 7th, 6:00pm (Location TBD)
*Add yourself to the Student Solidarity Network by emailing campaigns@cfsontario.ca

Nous irons jusqu’au bout,
The Public

(En français)

Comme organisateurs, activistes et  membres de communautées marginalisées, nous sommes bien conscients de l’ordre du jour d’austérité établi par nos gouvernements, attaquant directement la classe ouvrière et des pauvres, des femmes et des enfants, les personnes handicapé(e)s, gens de couleur; les peuples autochtones et les étudiantes. Nous savons que nos gouvernements sont de moins en moins intéresés par le bien-être de notre société, alors que nous continuons à ressentir les effets des réductions des services sociaux, les programmes communautaires et, plus récemment, de l’éducation accessible.

Plus de 400.000 étudiants sont descendues dans les rues de Montréal le 22 mai 2012 pour célébrer les 100 jours de la grève étudiante québécoise.

Ces étudiants et étudiantes ont démontré au reste du Canada que le pouvoir du peuple peut changer les politiques au niveau de l’État. Les étudiants on été grève et dans les rues pendant de plus de 100 jours et ils continuent à former des manifestations de plus en plus fortes pour exiger une éducation accessible à tous.

The Public Studio est fier de soutenir la lutte du mouvement étudiant québécois. L’appel à l’éducation accessible exige une critique directe des dépenses du gouvernement actuel à tous ses niveaux. L’argent est là; les coupures à l’éducation démontrent de priorités obliques de l’État.

La grève étudiante au Québec a devenu aujourd’hui un mouvement à l’échelle nationale contre la criminalisation de la dissidence. Nous croyons en la puissance de l’action directe, et le droit des étudiants et sympathisants à protester et de démonstrer en public.

Nous soutenons les efforts des organisateurs et des activistes, car ils présentent des demandes claires sur l’éducation accessible, la protection de l’environnement, la transparence financière, la fin de la brutalité policière et le droit à la liberté d’expression. Nous allons démontrer dans la solidarité et porter nos carrés rouges avec fierté et nous allons continuer à relier nos luttes et alimenter ce mouvement car il se propage à l’échelle nationale.

Ici, à Toronto, les syndicats d’étudiants, les organisateurs et les communautés outragés ont appelé à des actions à travers la ville. Nous vous invitons à nous rejoindre aux événements a travers la ville, a apprendre plus sur les problèmes et comment nous joindre en solidarité , et de nous visiter pour prendre votre propre carre rouge.

So much love 
juliosalgado83:

We are citizens of the world. 

So much love

juliosalgado83:

We are citizens of the world. 

(via perennialflight)

Tags: activism